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If there are 5 girls in your family and 2 hav ehad breast cancer what are the odds you will get it

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No Breast Cancer in My Family: What Are My Odds?

When it comes to understanding your risk for breast cancer, a thorough examination of your family history is crucial. However, if your family has no history of breast cancer, it can provide reassurance and offer several advantages. In this article, we will explore the benefits and conditions in which having no breast cancer in your family can influence your odds of developing the disease.

Benefits of No Breast Cancer in My Family:

  1. Lower Inherited Risk:

    • Without a family history of breast cancer, your inherited risk is significantly reduced.
    • You are less likely to carry certain genetic mutations associated with breast cancer, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2.
  2. Peace of Mind:

    • Knowing that breast cancer has not occurred in previous generations can provide emotional relief and peace of mind.
    • You can focus on maintaining a healthy lifestyle without constant worry about a family history of breast cancer.
  3. Reduced Surveillance Burden:

    • Individuals with a family history of breast cancer often require more frequent screenings and vigilant monitoring.
    • With no family history, you may have a less intensive surveillance regimen, reducing the burden of frequent medical appointments.

Conditions for Utilizing No Breast Cancer in My Family:

If there are 5 girls in your family and 2 hav ehad breast cancer what are the odds you will get it

Understanding the Odds of Developing Breast Cancer if There Are 5 Girls in Your Family and 2 Have Had It

Discover the likelihood of developing breast cancer if you belong to a family with 5 girls, 2 of whom have had the disease. This article sheds light on the factors affecting the odds and provides valuable insights for individuals concerned about their risk.

Breast cancer is a prevalent disease that affects millions of women worldwide. While genetics play a role in determining an individual's susceptibility to the disease, it is essential to understand the odds and risk factors associated with it. If you come from a family with 5 girls, and 2 of them have had breast cancer, you may naturally question your own risk. This article delves into the probabilities and contributing factors to help you gain a better understanding.

Understanding the Odds

When assessing your likelihood of developing breast cancer, several factors come into play:

  1. Genetic Predisposition:

    • Inheriting specific gene mutations, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, can significantly increase the risk of breast cancer. Genetic testing can help identify if you carry these mutations.
  2. Family History:

    • Having first-degree relatives, such as a mother or sister, with breast cancer can


Is breast cancer hereditary from aunts?

If one or more of these relatives has had breast or ovarian cancer, your own risk is significantly higher. If a grandmother, aunt or cousin has been diagnosed with the disease, your personal risk is usually not significantly changed, unless many of these "second-degree relatives" have had the disease.

How likely am I to get cancer if my aunt had it?

It's estimated that between 3 and 10 in every 100 cancers are associated with an inherited faulty gene. Cancers caused by inherited faulty genes are much less common than those caused by other factors, such as ageing, smoking, being overweight and not exercising regularly, or not eating a healthy, balanced diet.


What is considered strong family history of breast cancer?

Two or more first– or second-degree relatives from the same side of the family with breast cancer, if at least one breast cancer was diagnosed before age 50.

Will I get breast cancer if I have both sides of the family?

Having a first-degree relative (mother, sister, or daughter) with breast cancer almost doubles a woman's risk. Having 2 first-degree relatives increases her risk by about 3-fold. Women with a father or brother who has had breast cancer also have a higher risk of breast cancer.

How likely am I to get breast cancer if my mom has it?

Having a mother, sister or daughter (first degree relative) diagnosed with breast cancer approximately doubles the risk of breast cancer. This risk is higher when more close relatives have breast cancer, or if a relative developed breast cancer under the age of 50.

Frequently Asked Questions

How many years do breast cancer survivors live?

The overall 5-year relative survival rate for breast cancer is 90%. This means 90 out of 100 women are alive 5 years after they've been diagnosed with breast cancer. The 10-year breast cancer relative survival rate is 84% (84 out of 100 women are alive after 10 years).

Should I get tested for breast cancer if my mom has it?

Genetic counseling before genetic testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer is important to determine whether you and your family are likely enough to have a mutation that it is worth getting tested. Usually, genetic testing is recommended if you have: A strong family health history of breast and ovarian cancer.

Who is considered a first degree relative for breast cancer?

Having a mother, sister or daughter (first degree relative) diagnosed with breast cancer approximately doubles the risk of breast cancer.

What side of the family does breast cancer run in?

Some people think you can only get breast cancer from your mother's side of the family. But that's a myth. Breast cancer can come just as easily from your father's side.

FAQ

What are the chances of getting breast cancer if someone in the family has it?
About 15% of women diagnosed with breast cancer have a first-degree female relative (mother, sister or daughter) who's also had it [155]. A woman who has a first-degree female relative with breast cancer has about twice the risk of a woman without this family history [155-159].
What is considered a strong family history of breast cancer?
Two or more first– or second-degree relatives from the same side of the family with breast cancer, if at least one breast cancer was diagnosed before age 50.
What emotion is tied to breast cancer?
A life-changing diagnosis like breast cancer can dig up a lot of emotions. It's not uncommon to have depression, anxiety, uncertainty, fear, loneliness, and body image issues, among others. In fact, about 1 in 4 people with any type of cancer may have major or clinical depression and benefit from its treatment.

If there are 5 girls in your family and 2 hav ehad breast cancer what are the odds you will get it

What is the most aggressive form of breast cancer? Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive phenotype associated with poor prognosis. This condition is characterized by the lack of expression of (1) estrogen receptors (ER), (2) progesterone receptors (PR), and (3) the epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2).
Does HER2-positive breast cancer run in families? As with all types of breast cancer, what exactly causes HER2-positive breast cancer is unknown. It's likely a combination of risk factors, including lifestyle and environment. Genetics are also thought to play a role. However, the HER2 gene is not inherited from parents and can't be passed on to children.
Is HER2 mutation hereditary? That said, HER2 positive breast cancer is not hereditary – you can't inherit a bad HER2 gene from a parent or pass one on to a child.
  • What increases risk of HER2-positive breast cancer?
    • Being female (although rare, men can also develop breast cancer) Having a family history of breast cancer (this does not apply to HER2 positive breast cancers, which are not considered to be hereditary) Giving birth for the first time after age 30. Receiving radiation therapy to the chest.
  • What percentage of breast cancer survivors have a recurrence?
    • Research suggests that about 40% 1 of people diagnosed with early-stage triple-negative breast cancer are likely to have a recurrence and up to 50% of people 2 diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer are likely to have a recurrence.
  • Who is the biggest predictor of breast cancer?
    • A woman's risk for breast cancer is higher if she has a mother, sister, or daughter (first-degree relative) or multiple family members on either her mother's or father's side of the family who have had breast or ovarian cancer. Having a first-degree male relative with breast cancer also raises a woman's risk.